• Erie's Public Schools celebrates Black History Month

    Black History Month  

    Throughout the district, across grade levels, our schools are celebrating by engaging students in creative and innovative ways, even as some of our students continue to learn remotely.

    BHM at CA

    At the elementary level, students are reading biographies of Black men and women who have helped shape our history, learning about the Civil Rights movement, reading poetry by Maya Angelou, and more. At Jefferson Elementary School, fourth-graders wrote letters to Martin Luther King, Jr., about what they admired about him Black History Month at Lincoln and his work. Kindergartners discovered Black children’s book authors and investigated Black inventors. Fifth-graders at Perry Elementary School are creating Venn diagrams comparing 1960s segregation to today. McKinley students are watching important YouTube videos like the ABC's of Black History, 'I AM ENOUGH' Black Excellence-Read Aloud, and Kid's Explain Black History. 

    In our middle schools, students are undertaking research projects, creating presentations featuring famous African-Americans, and learning from guest speakers. At East Middle School, students are learning how music can help guide or lead a movement and exploring the careers of prominent African Americans in science, mathematics, and technology. They’re also learning how young people impacted the Civil Rights Movement by reading and highlighting main ideas about The Little Rock Nine, The Greensboro Four, Ruby Bridges, and The Children’s Crusade of 1963.   

    At Erie High School, students are creating artwork reflecting Black culture and people, studying the origins of blues music, and participating in a live Zoom meeting with Sam Pollard, director of the movie “MLK/FBI.” 

    Students from NWPA Collegiate Academy, at the instruction of Ms. Carla Hughes, recorded a performance for a virtual Black History Program sponsored by Gannon University and Penn State Behrend University and Life thru Music.  

    Black History Month at Edison

     

    These are just a few examples. These efforts reflect the many ways in which our district is honoring Black History Month. They also reflect our continued focus on, and commitment to, diversity, equity and inclusion, and help ensure our students see themselves reflected in what they're learning every day. 

    Return to this page often and visit the Facebook pages of individual schools to see photos of the celebration! 

      

    Captions: At top left, students from NWPA Collegiate Academy, at the instruction of Ms. Carla Hughes, recorded a performance for a virtual Black History Program sponsored by Gannon University, Penn State Behrend and Life thru Music. At top right, students at Lincoln Elementary School are celebrating the month with the theme "Love unites us." At bottom left, students in Amy Miehl's third-grade class at Edison Elementary School individually colored separate squares of paper that combine to create a beautiful picture of Martin Luther King, Jr.

     


Collegiate Academy's Black History Program - Performance by CADENCE (filmed in 2020)

Erie High School Daily Announcements - Black History Month 2021


  • Did you know .... ? 

     

    Our very own Pfeiffer-Burleigh Elementary School is named in part in honor of Erie-born musician and composer Harry T. Burleigh. Please take a moment to watch this episode of "We, Too, Sing America: African American Voices of Song," focusing on Burleigh and his legacy. "We, Too, Sing America" is a virtual series created by Aural Compass Projects during their 2020-2021 season. Aural Compass Projects describing the work: "This project is a resource for musicians and music lovers interested in learning through its exploration of 16 African American composers and poets who have contributed to the art song genre. Featuring interviews with modern-day leading performers and scholars of spirituals and African American art song, each episode focuses on a specific composer or poet’s life, influence, and their important works."

     Harry T. Burleigh YouTube video